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I read somewhere that self-feeding is an important developmental milestone and that it’s important to give baby the opportunity to learn this skill. Not sure if this is what hey had in mind…..

Next time I will fill the bath first.

http://thehonestmommy.com/2012/10/23/i-read-somewhere-that-self-feeding-is-an-important/

Work-At-Home Parents

I think quite a few people have the wrong idea of what exactly it means to be a stay-at-home parent. As I mentioned in an earlier post, I actually really hate this term. I think it has a negative stigma attached to it. For some reason, many people feel defined by their career. So, when a woman is asked what she does for a living, which is always one of the first questions in casual conversation, she feels obligated to say she is “just” a stay-at-home mom. I’ve done it already. I’ve even said things like, “I’m just taking a year off,” because it sounds better than saying I don’t work right now. I decided to call myself a work-at-home mother. I don’t “just” stay at home. I do a lot of things during the day. I am employed by my son, my dog, and my house. I even watch two other children for a family down the street three and a half days a week (By the way, to those of you parents with three children, you’re crazy).   

So here is a short list of a things that people think a stay at home parent does during the day.

Stay-at-Home Parents:

1.) Sleep in
2.) Hang out in PJs
3.) Stare at a perfectly happy, content, and smiling baby
4.) Go to lunch with friends
5.) Take baby for a walk
6.) Drink coffee
7.) Shop
8.) Watch daytime TV
9.) Relax while the baby naps
10.) Wait for their wonderful partners to return home from work

Now let me clarify this for you….

Work-at-Home Parents:

1.) Sleep in – If by sleep, you mean bringing the baby into my bed at 5:00am and lying as still as possible while praying he falls back to sleep, then sure, I sleep in every morning.

2.) Hang out in pajamas – If I am still in pajamas at noon, it’s not by choice. Trust me; I’d love a few minutes to shower and change.

3.) Stare at a perfectly happy, smiling, and content baby – If I am staring at my child while he’s perfectly happy and content, I am only staring due to pure shock since it rarely happens. Don’t get me wrong, I am blessed with a very happy baby, but damn, that kid is busy. He doesn’t sit still and content – ever.

4.) Go to lunch with friends – I don’t know if you consider a play date having lunch with friends…. But on that note, play dates are absolutely necessary for both parent and child. You can only spend so much time talking to an eight-month-old before you really need some adult time to regain your sanity.

5.) Take baby for a walk – You’re right about this one. When all else fails, take the baby for a walk. You don’t have to chase him if he’s strapped into the stroller.

6.) Drink coffee – Oh yeah, I drink a lot of coffee; however, usually it’s coffee that I made at 5:00am (since the baby didn’t go back to sleep) that I didn’t get an opportunity to reheat and drink until 9:30am.

7.) Shop – The only shopping I am doing during the week is for diapers and baby food. When I was pregnant, I thought I was going to make homemade baby food. The baby food processor is still in the box. I am definitely going to re-gift that.

8.) Watch daytime TV – Yes, actually. The children I babysit have introduced me to a whole new realm of daytime television: Bubble Guppies at 9:00, Max and Ruby at 12:00, Dora the Explorer at 2:00…

9.) Relax while baby naps – IF the baby naps, I take the opportunity to do the following: clean up the 200 toys Greyson has played with today, throw out the teddy bear that the dog shredded this morning, sterilize the bottles, toss my sheets in the wash since Grey spit up in them this morning while I was praying he was going back to sleep, and so on. You get the idea.

10.) Wait for their loving partners to return home from work – Oh, we’re waiting for them all right. You don’t get a lunch hour you are a work-at-home parent, so by 6:00pm, we need to hand that baby off! Think of yourself as a relief pitcher stepping in at the top of the ninth to close the game. It’s a crucial part of the team. I know a lot of working parents don’t get a lunch break either, so we are thankful that you so willingly work hard all day and come home and help out as much as you do. Thanks for that J

So the next time you are out and you ask someone what they do for a living and they reply that they stay at home with their child, show some respect! It might not be the highest paying position, but I’d argue that it’s the most important and most rewarding.